Labradoodle Size Chart For Mini, Medium, and Standard Labradoodles

Labradoodle Size Chart For Mini, Medium, and Standard Labradoodles
Table of Contents
    Add a header to begin generating the table of contents

    Labradoodles are notorious for their inconsistent sizes. If you own a Labradoodle pup, there’s no telling just how big they’ll get when they reach maturity.

    A Labradoodle is a crossbreed between a Labrador and a Poodle, so you can never quite know which dog species will influence your pet’s size more.

    If you don’t know which kind of Poodle – standard, miniature, or toy – that your pet was born from, then you’re left in the dark even more.

    Today we’re going to cover all of your bases by going through the sizes of mini, medium, and standard Labradoodles. By learning the growth patterns of each, you can anticipate how large your pet may get and take the relevant advice to help with nutrition and lifestyle.

    While we’ve gone into more detail below, here’s a very brief rundown for those of you who want some immediate peace of mind:

    Miniature LabradoodleMedium LabradoodleStandard Labradoodle
    Height (at the shoulder)13” to 17”17” to 20”20” to 26”
    Weight15 to 25 pounds (6.8 to 11.3kg)25 to 50 pounds (11.3 to 22.6kg)50 to 90 pounds (22.6 to 40.8kg)
    Adulthood11 to 13 months11 to 13 months12.5 to 16 months

    Labradoodle Growth Patterns

    Before we get into the specific Labradoodle sizes that are possible, let’s talk about their growth patterns. All kinds of Labradoodle will grow faster during their first six months when they’re advancing from puppyhood to adolescence.

    This is assuming that they are being raised with the correct nourishment and environment that best suits this breed, of course.

    After another six months, when your Labradoodle becomes a year old, they should have done most of their height growth. They can grow a little more but not in any substantial way, so you’ll be able to accurately determine the size of your dog now.

    As for their weight, here’s a rough guide on the expected weights of these dogs as they develop.

    8 Weeks16 Weeks24 Weeks32 Weeks40 Weeks48 Weeks1 Year
    Mini Labradoodle7lbs (3kg)14lbs
    (6kg)
    20lbs
    (9kg)
    25lbs
    (11kg)
    Growth FinishedGrowth FinishedGrowth Finished
    Medium Labradoodle8lbs
    (3.5kg)
    20lbs
    (9kg)
    30lbs
    (13.5kg)
    32lbs
    (14.5kg)
    35lbs
    (15.5kg)
    38lbs
    (17kg)
    40lbs
    (18kg)
    Standard Labradoodle10lbs
    (4.5kg)
    28lbs
    (12.5kg)
    40lbs
    (18kg)
    50lbs
    (22.5kg)
    53lbs
    (24kg)
    59 lbs
    (26.5kg)
    60+ pounds
    (27+kg)

    Mini Labradoodle Sizes

    Mini Labradoodles grow pretty fast. They don’t need to grow much, after all. They reach roughly half their overall final weight within five months and then they have a slow but steady growth until they hit nine to thirteen months.

    There they stop growing. If you have a mini Labradoodle who’s over a year old, you can rest assured that they have done all their growing already.

    Medium Labradoodle Sizes

    Medium Labradoodles are the same as minis, reaching approximately half their total weight within five or six months of age. Once that period of rapid puppy growth has finished, their growth will then continue slowly until it hits a plateau at eleven months.

    The size of a medium Labradoodle after a year, maybe a year and two months, will be the final size of your pet.

    For medium Labradoodles, their growth can be somewhat calculated using a formula. This formula also works for minis to an extent, so try it if you’re interested and have a growing Labradoodle bounding around your home. Don’t worry, it’s not that complicated! There are only two steps.

    1. Wait until your Labradoodle becomes eighteen weeks old.
    2. Measure that weight and multiply it by two.

    Doing this should give you a good estimate on the final weight of your dog once they hit adulthood and stop growing.

    Here’s an example! If you have a medium Labradoodle, many of them will be between twenty and thirty pounds at eighteen weeks old. Let’s go down the middle and make it twenty-four, so we’re working with even numbers.

    If weight at 18 weeks x 2 = adult weight, then that’ll be 24 x 2 = 48.

    That’s in line with the widely reported adult weight of medium Labradoodles, between forty and fifty pounds.

    Standard Labradoodle Sizes

    As the largest Labradoodle type, you may be most worried if you’re the proud owner of a standard Labradoodle. Let’s put those worries to rest by explaining how these dogs grow.

    Like other Labradoodles, standard Labradoodles will grow pretty fast for the first six months. This can be slightly faster than the others too, topping at four months if your pup is a fast grower.

    Then it plateaus, like all the others, and climbs to its full weight after one year to a year and a half, typically sixteen months. This will usually be around sixty pounds but it can be larger too.

    So, how big will your Labradoodle get? Fortunately, there’s a calculation for that too! It’s slightly different from the mini/medium formula but the process is exactly the same.

    To get the weight estimate, you measure your dog’s weight at twenty-three weeks old. Once you have that figure, times that by two and you have the adult weight estimate, it’s that easy. 

    Assuming a twenty-three-week weight of thirty-eight pounds, you can expect the formula to work out like this:

    38 x 2 = 76 pounds.

    That’s in line with the average standard Labradoodle, which can be anywhere over sixty pounds but commonly can reach into the seventies and even eighties, depending on how much Labrador genetics are at play.

    Conclusion

    For most people, the idea that we can see into the future and predict how our Labradoodle puppies will grow would be a huge benefit in terms of facilitating their dietary and lifestyle requirements. After all there is a huge difference between a small 25lbs doodle and a large 60lbs pooch.

    You may also be interested in:

    Scroll to Top